Metropolitan Manila - Metro Manila (National Capital Region)
(Filipino: Kalakhang Maynila, Kamaynilaan), commonly known as Metro Manila, the National Capital Region (NCR)

Parañaque History - From Palanyag to Parañaque - Parañaque Cityhood - Parañaque City Today - Paranaque Cityhood
Paranaque from Palanyag - Paranaque History - Paranaque Today - Paranaque Etymology - Paranaque Special Interest
Paranaque Transportation - Paranaque Barangays - Paranaque Events and Festivals - Global City Taguig and Paranaque

Parañaque Islands Philippines
History - From Palanyag to Parañaque

Palanyag, the old name for the city of Parañaque, generally means "my beloved", among other definitions, for as far as its residents are concerned, this best describes their affection for their hometown. Another version came from the combination of the terms "palayan" and "palalayag", the former meaning ricefields of which the city once abounded in and the latter pertaining to the sailing and fishing occupation of many of its residents. This was also a sign of cooperation and goodwill between the two major working sectors of the town, the farmers and the fishermen. It was however a drunken guest, during a certain affair which decided on the final name, who said "Mabuhay ang Palanyag at ang mga taga-Palanyag! (Long live Palanyag and the people of Palanyag!)" So the name stuck from that day on. Another version, according to tradition, was when a Spanish soldier told the driver of his caruaje or horse-drawn carriage, to "Para aqui, para aqui (Stop here, stop here)!" The driver, uncomprehending, kept on prodding his horse to go on while the soldier angrily repeated his instruction: "Para aqui, para aqui!" Onlookers just laughed as the Spaniards empathically said "para aniya aqui para aniya aqui (he said 'stop here' he said 'stop here)." For days the incident was repeated around and term "para aniya aqui" stuck. There is another story that says of an imposing balete tree at the mouth of the Parañaque. It looked like a boat sailing slowly and majestically, earning the Tagalog term Palanyag, a corruption of the term "palayag" which means "point of navigation". Further adulteration of the word later resulted in the word "palanyaque". A historian believes the town's name may have come from the term "palanas" which means a "broad flat plain," the geographic description of Parañaque.

Other origins of the name Parañaque are "palanac" (with no special meaning), "patanyag" or contest for popularity, and "paranac", a native term for the shell product that used to be the livelihood of the natives of the town at one time. Parañaque, in the olden times, was where many people unboard the "kalesa", or horse-drawn carriage and would usually tell the conductor to "para na aque", which literally means "stop now, boy". The word "para", taken from the Spanish word "parar" which means to stop, "na" is a term in the Filipino language which means "now", and "aque" taken from the Filipino term "lalaki" or "lalake", meaning "boy". The phrase "para na aque" was used so often that it eventually evolved into a term pertaining to a place, thus, Parañaque. An alternative meaning of "para na aque" is "stop here", where the term "'aque'" might have also come from the Spanish word "aqui" which means "here". Whatever the correct origin of the name of Parañaque, the various terms strongly suggest the town's storied and mosaic past.

During the Philippine Revolution, Parañaque became one of the hottest battle zones due to its location halfway between the province of Cavite, where the revolutionaries held sway, and Manila, the seat of the Spanish colonial government.

During the American occupation of the Philippines, Parañaque became one of the first municipalities in the Metro Manila region.


Travel Quotes:

When traveling with someone, take large does of patience and tolerance with your morning coffee. Helen Hayes

Travel becomes a strategy for accumulating photographs. Susan Sontag

Philippines Cuisine Characteristics

The traditional way of eating is with the hands, especially dry dishes such as inihaw or prito. The diner will take a bite of the main dish, then eat rice pressed together with his fingers.

This practice, known as kamayan, is rarely seen in urbanized areas. However, Filipinos tend to feel the spirit of kamayan when eating amidst nature during out of town trips, beach vacations, and town fiestas.

More details at Philippines Cuisine Characteristics

Luzon Philippines Area
Baguio Philippines, Banaue Philippines, Bataan Philippines, Batangas Philippines, Cavite Philippines, La Union Philippines, Laguna Philippines, Laoag Philippines, Makati Philippines, Manila Philippines, Mindoro Philippines, Ortigas Philippines, Pagudpod Hotels (Ilocos), Palawan Philippines, Pampanga Philippines, Pangasinan Philippines, Puerto Galera Philippines, Quezon City Philippines, Subic Philippines, Tagaytay Philippines, Tarlac Philippines

Visayas Philippines Area
Bacolod Philippines, Bohol Philippines, Boracay Philippines, Cebu Philippines, Guimaras Philippines, Iloilo Philippines, Leyte Philippines, Negros Philippines

Mindanao Philippines Area
Cagayan de Oro Philippines, Davao Philippines, Zamboanga Philippines


Like Us on Facebook

Like IslandsPhilippines.com on Facebook

Islands Philippines

Website Visitors by Country



Islands Philippines - About Islands Philippines - Destinations Philippines - Islands Philippines Advertising

While we strive to present information as accurately as possible,
We are not responsible for any mistakes in information materials, written or any other kind.
All Rights Reserved. Islands Philippines © Copyright - Sunday 01st of August 2021 08:29:25 PM